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Entries in Programming (10)

Sunday
May192013

How to be a "woman programmer"

How to Be a ‘Woman Programmer’ - NYTimes.com:

But none of it qualified me as extraordinary in the great programmer scheme of things. What seems to have distinguished me is the fact that I was a “woman programmer.” The questions I am often asked about my career tend to concentrate not on how one learns to code but how a woman does.

 

Friday
Mar152013

Everyone should know how to program

Monday
Apr022012

[GEEKY] Sublime Text surpassing TextMate?

I've been doing some more coding these days in Ruby.

I've had great success and fun (especially when debugging) using RadRails, which is an Eclipse based IDE for Ruby and Rails. It's quite nice.

With introduction of RVM, bundler, and so on, I've gotten a feeling that RadRails maybe too much. It seems to get contexts confused and create more hassles. I am not sure yet, but it's caused me to go back and use TextMate, which I've always had in an honored spot in my toolset.

Poking around forums and other resources there seems to be some frustration that TextMate 2 has not been completed yet, having been 'in development' for I think over two years. Also there seems to be more and more talk of Sublime Text 2 as a great alternative to TextMate. So… Here I go. I will report back.

Thursday
Feb162012

MapReduce Patterns and Examples

Great review article:

"In this article I digested a number of MapReduce patterns and algorithms to give a systematic view of the different techniques that can be found in the web or scientific articles. Several practical case studies are also provided. All descriptions and code snippets use the standard Hadoop’s MapReduce model with Mappers, Reduces, Combiners, Partitioners, and sorting. This framework is depicted in the figure below." (from Highly Scalable)

Worth reading if you are interested in how Hadoop and friends might apply to the problems that you are trying to solve: "MapReduce Patterns, Algorithms, and Use Cases"

Sunday
Jan012012

I wish I knew more JavaScript

I know basic Javascript. I think I will be learning more soon. I think JavaScript is the language of the (near) future. Predicting what the language of the (further) future is would be impossible, as programming languages come and go. Hopefully they get better as they evolve.

Why do I say that it is the language of the (near) future? Compared, for example to Java, or Ruby or Python, or even Erlang? Here's an article I wrote about that: how JavaScript may be the most important language for the web for the near future. Do you agree?

With that context, I was very interested to see Jon Ressig's article about how Khan Academy is thinking about teaching programming languages. You know I am a big fan of Khan Academy: see Khan Academy to the Rescue.

Here's what Jon has to say about JavaScript as a first language:

"At Khan Academy we've been investigating teaching Computer Science to students in some new and interesting ways. The most interesting aspect of which is that we're likely going to be teaching them JavaScript as their first language." (from: JavaScript as a first Language)

Read the whole article, it's pretty cool!

 

Friday
Jul292011

[GEEKY] Best Tutorial for Android OpenGL

If you are interested in graphics programming and gaming, let me strongly recommend you take a look at this 6 part tutorial on 3D graphics development on Android.


Open GL ES Programming on Android


'Nuf said.

Saturday
Jul162011

[GEEKY] Good link of Rails Tips

Tuesday
Jun282011

[GEEKY] Full Applications that run in the browser

Sproutcore is a JavaScript framework for writing powerful web applications with less code. It looks to me as a way to write a lot more of your application in JavaScript running in the browser. And this involves moving the logic of the application's own logic there.


Sproutcore is a big complicated system that I have not fully investigated. It comes with a good pedigree though and is very nicely documented and designed. Worth a look if you want to have a super responsive browser based app that will continue to work even when the network connection is gone.


Here is their own blurb: "SproutCore applications move business logic to the browser so they can respond to your users' taps and clicks immediately, avoiding an agonizing roundtrip across often intermittent network connections.

As web application users go increasingly mobile, applications can no longer depend on reliable connections to a remote server to do the heavy lifting.


At the same time, web browsers continue to radically improve their ability to quickly process data and deliver polished user interfaces—a perfect opportunity to rethink the architecture of modern web applications."



 

Saturday
Jun252011

[GEEKY] JavaScript - Universal Language of the Future

JavaScript is the language of the future. Why do I say this?

I love Ruby, I respect Java, and I am jealous of Python. And of course I have a warm spot in my heart for C++. Think about it. JavaScript is unique among all those languages:

  • Any computer you can get your hands on nowadays has a working, and probably very fast JavaScript compiler/interpreter. Laptops, Desktops, Servers, Mac, Pc, Linux, Phone, Tablet. ALL OF THEM.  You can't say that of any of the other languages.

  • Because of the browser wars, and probably spurred on by Google and Chrome, there has been enormous investment in JavaScript performance so that it is now respected as a viable high performance language for server side apps.

  • As a language, it's not shabby. Most people don't think about JavaScript as a full fledged programming language, but it does have some great characteristics.

If you don't believe me, here's another person who comes to the same conclusion by a slightly different route:

"Web servers, rich web client libraries, HTML5, databases, even JavaScript-based languages: I see JavaScript everywhere. If you have avoided JavaScript, this is the year to learn it. There's no excuse — and if you don't, you risk being left behind." (from "Why a JavaScript Hater thinks everyone needs to learn JavaScript in the next year.")

So, go learn JavaScript. You will need it for your next job.

Wednesday
Jan282009

[GEEKY] Where are the east coast Rails / Ruby conferences?

"So yet another way you can help Ruby and Rails Activism is by attending
(supporting) a conference. Below you’ll find conferences coming up in
the next 6 months. If you think I’ve missed one, or if the information
is incorrect, please post a comment." (from Riding Rails)

If you look at the list of conferences and meetings, all looking interesting, there's nothing anywhere near Boston. Hey, whatup?